RHACC Gender Pay Gap Report 2018

RHACC supports and promotes fair and equitable treatment for all staff irrespective of gender and uses pay scales and grading system according to job roles.

From 2017 onwards, the Equality Act 2010 (Specific Duties and Public Authorities) Regulations 2017 requires UK organisations with 250 or more employees, to publicly report the differences between the average earnings of men and women in the organisation.

This regulation did not apply to the College last year, as at the time of the snap shot date, Hillcroft College had less than 250 employees and RACC had dissolved under a type B merger.

The regulations require the College to submit to government and publish on the College website the gender pay gap position at a ‘snap shot date’, which for the College, as a registered charity is 5th April of each year. This report relates to the ‘snap shot date’ of 5 April 2018.

 

There are six specific ways in which the College is required to report this data:

1. Mean gender pay gap: The difference between the mean hourly rate of pay of male full-pay relevant employees and that of female full-pay relevant employees

2. Median gender pay gap: The difference between the median hourly rate of pay of male full-pay relevant employees and that of female full-pay relevant employees

3. Mean bonus gap: The difference between the mean bonus pay paid to male relevant employees and that paid to female relevant employees

4. Median bonus gap: The difference between the median bonus pay paid to male relevant employees and that paid to female relevant employees

5. Bonus proportions: The proportions of male and female relevant employees who were paid bonus pay during the relevant period

6. Quartile pay bands: The proportions of male and female full-pay relevant employees in the lower, middle, upper middle and upper quartile pay bands, where “Lower Quartile” represents lowest salaries and “Upper Quartile” represents the highest salaries.

 

The gender pay gap is not the same as equal pay. Equal pay ensures that men and women receive equal pay for equal work whereas the gender pay gap analyses the differences in average hourly rates, across all levels of an organisation, to identify disparities in average earnings between men and women. The gender pay gap is calculated as percentage difference between the two rates; a positive percentage indicates that men receive a higher hourly rate than women whilst a negative percentage indicates that women receive a higher hourly rate compared to their male colleagues.

 

Findings:

1. Mean gender pay gap

-5%

2. Median gender pay gap

-1%

3. Median bonus gap

N/A

4. Median bonus gap

N/A

5. Bonus proportions

N/A

 

*The College does not pay bonuses to any staff so points 3- 5 above are not applicable.

 

Quartiles:

Quartiles

Males

Females

Upper

22%

 

78%

 

Upper Middle

31%

69%

Lower Middle

23%

77%

Lower

31%

69%

 

Like most of the College sector, RHACC has a higher percentage of female workers than males. Females made up 73% of the workforce and males 27% on the snap shot date. 

Despite sector trends in male and female workforce profiles, the Times Educational Supplement analysis, based on gender pay gap data submitted by more than 3,500 employers in the first year of reporting, women working in FE fare less favourably than the national average in terms of the median gender pay gap.

It revealed that the average median gender pay gap across the 120 FE and sixth-form colleges which had provided gender pay data was 14.4 per cent – significantly above the 11.6 per cent average.

Summary

As can be seen from the data above RHACC is in fact reporting a reverse gender pay gap of -1%, meaning that female staff earn very slightly more per hour on average than their counterparts. This is in contrast to the national picture.

This may in part be attributed to the fact that at the snap shot date the College’s Executive team consisted of 3 females and 0 males. The College Senior Management team (excluding the Executive members) consisted of a 50:50 split of males and females at the time, which remains the case currently.